Ozymandias line by line explanation meritnation. line by line explanation ozymandias 2019-01-08

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Analysis and Summary of Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley

ozymandias line by line explanation meritnation

The reader also does not know where the speaker first met this sojourner. Analysis Shelley's irregular sonnet on the fragments of a huge statue of an Egyptian pharaoh begins with a statement that arouses the interest of the reader at once: I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Lines 1-2 I met a traveller from an antique land Who said. The first part of the traveler's story reads, Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Now, the leader is gone, and so is his empire. It says the real fact of this world. The story is a characteristically Shelleyan one about tyranny and how time makes a mockery of the boastfulness of even the most powerful kings.


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CBSE Class X English Support Material

ozymandias line by line explanation meritnation

As we all know, nothing lasts forever; that means even the very worst political leaders — no matter how much they boast — all die at some point. Yet, communicating words present a different set of problems. The last five lines are the heart of this poem. The second complete sentence, which begins in line 3, is a good example. That principle may well remain valid, but it is undercut by the plain fact that even an empire is a human creation that will one day pass away.

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Summary of ozymandias

ozymandias line by line explanation meritnation

Although it is neither a Petrarchan sonnet nor a Shakespearean sonnet, the rhyming scheme and style resemble a Petrarchan sonnet more, particularly with its 8-6 structure rather than 4-4-4-2. Or he could just be coming from a place that has an older history, like Greece, Rome, or ancient Egypt. The sculptor might even grasp things about the ruler that the ruler himself doesn't understand. Shelley was such a masterful writer that it does not take much effort on the part of the reader to clearly imagine the scene in this poem. Take line 12 for example: No-thing be- side re- mains: round the de- cay The line begins with a stressed syllable followed by an unstressed syllable; this is called a trochee, and it's the reverse of an iamb. The statue that inspired the poem was partially destroyed, and the poem frequently reminds us that the statue is in ruins. The statue's head is half-buried in the sand, after all, and we are left wondering what role the erosive force of dust storms, wind, and rain played in its destruction.

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Ozymandias by Percy Shelley: Summary and Analysis

ozymandias line by line explanation meritnation

The traveler told the speaker a story about an old, fragmented statue in the middle of the desert. For extra support with poetry analysis, why not book a lesson with one of our experienced? Round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, The lone and level sands stretch far away. Round the decay Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare The lone and level sands stretch far away. The king whose resemblance the statue depicts is also dead. We know that later in the poem Ozymandias will brag about the greatness of his works, but here he seems less than satisfied with something, as if he thinks his works could be better. Round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, The lone and level sands stretch far away. In the story, he describes visiting Egypt and seeing a large and intimidating statue in the sand.

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Ozymandias

ozymandias line by line explanation meritnation

There is just a lot of sand, as far as the eye can see. The sculptor interpreted his subject well. He abandoned his family to be with her; they married after his first wife committed suicide, and Mary changed her surname to Shelley. The final caesura repeats this effective trick, following 'Nothing beside remains. While you've probably heard of iambic pentameter, Shelley's poem makes it really hard to use that designation. This rhyme scheme differs from the rhyme scheme of a traditional Petrarchan sonnet, whose octave the first eight lines of the poem usually has a rhyme scheme of abbaabba; its sestet the final six lines of the sonnet does not have an assigned rhyme scheme, but it usually rhymes every other line, or contains three different rhymes.

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Ozymandias Analysis

ozymandias line by line explanation meritnation

Answer: Ozymandias may have become a powerful king by defeating the other kings. What quality of the king is revealed through this statement? He had obviously read about it in some other source also since he knew that the statue was no longer intact. It could be in the speaker's head, in a dream, on the street, or in the desert; it sort of resembles something that might occur in a youth hostel or a tavern in London. The face looks stern and powerful, like a ruler. So the sculptor both belittled and copied this man's passions. There was probably once a temple or something nearby, but it's long gone. But if you think these lines are unclear, you're right.

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Ozymandias by Percy Shelley: Summary and Analysis

ozymandias line by line explanation meritnation

The statue and surrounding desert constitute a metaphor for invented power in the face of natural power. Now one looks and sees nothing whatsoever. What message does the poet want to convey? The man was drunk with power and strength. Here, the contrast is between the lifelike accuracy of the face and the fact that it is sculpted from stone. He can do what he wants without thinking of other people. Finally, we cannot miss the general comment on human vanity in the poem. The poet begins the poem by expressing that he had met a traveler who had seen an ancient ruined statue in a desert.

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Percy Shelley: Poems “Ozymandias” Summary and Analysis

ozymandias line by line explanation meritnation

Near the standing legs he also came across the broken head shattered visage of the statue that was partially buried in the sand. Immortality is the fact concerned with views, time, poetry and goodness only. What do you make of all this repetition? The sculptor who was commissioned to make the statue had aptly captured the destructive and exploitative desires of the emperor. However, these words stand as perfect contrast to the actual situation of the statue depicted. These lines describe a very strange image; just imagine two legs in the middle of the desert, with a head partly submerged nearby.

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Analysis Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley

ozymandias line by line explanation meritnation

Over a century , Shelley presents a land laid waste and a pessimistic view of human civilisation. The octave first eight lines of a sonnet and the sestet last six-line stanza of a sonnet are linked together. In his attempt to describe the poet, he speaks about a ruined statue whose broken legs are standing and the body is half deep in the sand. Maybe if we keep reading we'll find out. While one can read this poem to be about an ancient leader of Egypt, the poem could also be read as a criticism for the world in which Shelley lived. The statue is in part a stand-in or substitute for all kinds of art painting, poetry, etc.


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