The windhover analysis. Analysis of The Windhover by Gerard Manley Hopkins 2019-01-09

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A Short Analysis of Hopkins’s ‘The Windhover’

the windhover analysis

As the subtitle suggests, the poem is a thanksgiving to Christ. No wonder of it: shéer plód makes plough down sillion Shine, and blue-bleak embers, ah my dear, Fall, gall themselves, and gash gold-vermilion. Through such a self-surrender the poet would see splendour in the falcon which is a billion times lovelier than is visible at a superficial view. The poem is widely anthologized, a cornerstone of the English canon, bridging the Victorian Age and early 20th century Modernism. When the poet sees the beautiful bird, he is reminded of Christ and becomes thankful and appreciative of him. We may speculate on what Hopkins might have produced had he not become a Roman Catholic and a Jesuit, if he had not burned his poems when he changed his life, if he had not been subjected to years of depressing, unchallenging work that no doubt added to the weight and physical effects of his depression, but that is pointless.

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A Short Analysis of Hopkins’s ‘The Windhover’

the windhover analysis

Hopkins himself thought it was the best thing he ever wrote. Again, it immediately seemed to me that this was a love poem. In the same way, fidelity in religious life just as Christ compared the religious life to taking up the plough produces brightness in the soul. The poet tells his heart to surrender itself completely to Christ. The first half of the first stanza uses many instances of alliteration in each line, so when spoken they roll up and down and back up again like the falcon riding the wind; when it says he goes off on a swing the sound of the words shift to more smooth ones, with less alliteration. No wonder of it: shéer plód makes plough down sillion Shine, and blue-bleak embers, ah my dear, Fall, gall themselves, and gash gold-vermilion. It can be argued all the same that the concluding lines of the poem are cathartic nevertheless.

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12. The Windhover. Hopkins, Gerard Manley. 1918. Poems

the windhover analysis

Most people do not like puzzle-poems that are difficult to understand, that must be deciphered or interpreted, and such poems are a great frustration to many students of English literature. By implication, the poem is therefore a poem of thanksgiving to Christ. So what does the poem really mean? The third stanza starts out reflecting the turn of the poem, suddenly plodding instead of flying, with words that need space to fit in the mouth, each one a heavy step upon the ground. Hopkins felt poetry should not be attributed to personal goals, and in his capacity of a priest dedicated to God, he felt it was his duty to rebut individual desires. Line 11 : chevalier - french for knight, champion Line 12 : sillion - ridge between two furrows Line 14 : gall - break the surface of. So the change in this second part of the sonnet is a definite break from what has gone before.

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12. The Windhover. Hopkins, Gerard Manley. 1918. Poems

the windhover analysis

C Children's Language School Research lab facility for job seekers Subscribe us :. Nor does long our small Durance deal with that steep or deep. Brute beauty and valor and act, oh, air, pride, plume, here Buckle! The falcon hovers against a headwind while searching for prey, and when it finds a victim, it may plummet with incredible speed. The power of the bird is in the decsent. The subsequent image is of embers breaking open to reveal a smoldering interior. His steps on the soil make a semblance shape of a wound gash when the blood-red vermilion and golden light of the sun is cast on it. He has left us a number of poems of varying effectiveness and varying opacity, and we can take pleasure in turning them over in our minds like stones from a quarry, seeing here and there in them the sudden, strange, opalescent shine of gemstone in the matrix, the glory of his mind and creativity.

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The Windhover, by Hopkins: Sound, Image, Meaning

the windhover analysis

I denote from your comments that you seem to think Hopkins only developed his spirituality once he converted and became a Jesuit Catholic but he had been a devout C of E man prior and the understanding of the Paschal Mystery which is what the Windhover is about would be the same in both variants of Christianity. The windhover is a kid of hawk of falcon. But we shouldn't be surprised when this fabulous falcon elicits such spiritual energy. Brute beauty and valour and act, oh, air, pride, plume, here Buckle! My heart in hiding Stirred for a bird, —the achieve of; the mastery of the thing! Summary The windhover is a bird with the rare ability to hover in the air, essentially flying in place while it scans the ground in search of prey. My heart in hiding Stirred for a bird, —the achieve of; the mastery of the thing! Besides this, he also holds law degree. Unlike allegory there is no single meaning that can be argued as truth in a poem; more on the lines of myth, many things can be argued following lines of theme. More significant however is the transformation of the bird into a spiritual symbol of Christ.

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Gerard Manley Hopkins: “The Windhover” by Ange Mlinko

the windhover analysis

I have also memorized several poems, foolishly hoping to stave off inevitable losses. He has has a degree in English literature from Delhi University, and Mass Communication from Bhartiya Vidhya Bhavan, Delhi. The sense of religious awe is a world away from. Finally, the grammar is also odd; actually the poem does not follow any traditional grammar and structure. It is as if Hopkins intended to create multiple ideas in some of his images, each interesting and valid in its own way. The kestrel Windhover has to be observed to understand the poem. Today I want to talk about Gerard Manley Hopkins, that sad figure with his hidden glories, a man who, I think, lost himself in converting to Roman Catholicism and becoming a Jesuit; it seems to have made his life ever more miserable.

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12. The Windhover. Hopkins, Gerard Manley. 1918. Poems

the windhover analysis

The bird is so called because he has a tendency to hover in the wind. At moments when humans arrive at the fullness of their moral nature, they achieve something great. He is projecting his admiration, his emotion, onto the windhover. So, what follows is a very brief analysis of the poem, designed to act as a short introduction to its linguistic power and its themes. The suggestion is that common things hold an almost mystical significance and are charged with potential. The poem, it turns out, is an epistemological narrative unfurling: What are we seeing? The last and deepest layer is what it might mean on a symbolic level; what it all, put together, is. God as feminine, as an enfolding, as a wrinkle we lose ourselves in… paired with the fierce imagery of the hunter.

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Gerard Manley Hopkins: “The Windhover” by Ange Mlinko

the windhover analysis

It is difficult to hear his invention of Sprung Rhythm, if his lines must be broken because of page margins. It rides the air as if it were on horseback, moving with steady control like a rider whose hold on the rein is sure and firm. Hopkins once said that we should read his poetry with our ears, which seems like an impossibility but is not, since many of the sounds we hear create images in our mind. I had never read the poem before and found it filled me with the love of the moment, for I was there watching the sight the words born, I was there and my heart over flowed in receiving such a gift. No wonder of it: shéer plód makes plough down sillion Shine, and blue-bleak embers, ah my dear, Fall, gall themselves, and gash gold-vermilion. More poetry analysis can be , and we have some here. No wonder of it: sheer plod makes plough down sillion Shine, and blue-bleak embers, ah my dear, Fall, gall themselves, and gash gold-vermillion.

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